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ronracer asked:

Would you care to go into detail of why you don't like open spaced island enclosures?

waeshael:

zoo-help:

When it comes to primates, I feel like they aren’t very functional, nor do they encourage much stimulation for primates.

Before i go on, In this answer i will be posting some pictures as examples. This is all purely my own opinion and even then i’am open to all schools of thought..I do not bear any personal ill will to the organisations or keepers looking after these exhibits. It is not a means of shaming anyone..and I will not name them by name..They are just mere examples.

In the present modern day, the perception of an animal being behind bars is seen as cruel and many people disagree with it. So These island enclosures look wide open, spacious and humane..and with a plus for institutions they give visitors an almost totally unobstructed view of the animals with huge windows and look out points across moats or high walls.

The down side to this, due to the fact the area is not enclosed, you are sevrely limited in what kind of climbing apparatus you can put inside the exhibit to prevent animals escaping. Almost every ‘island’ I’ve ever witnessed has climbing frames in the middle of enclosure and can’t offer much else. I found that the animals look bored and not stimulated by their evironment at all. 

image

image

Large trees, plants and moats are then ‘Hot wired’ with electric wire which have a small charge to stop animals climbing up..trees they’re not supposed to? as it could aid their escape..oh also it just looks nice for the visitors. :/ Personally, I find hot grasses and wire a huge eyesore as most of them are as clear as day..and kind of destroy that ‘natural’ look that zoos try to go for..your typical visitor will probably not notice I’m sure. 

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Im also of the mind that they kind of rob animals of their full capability to climb in many different ways as they would in a forest. There are a variety of layers in a forest, from the floor all the way up to the top of the canopy. Now, Granted you will never be able to replicate the wild. I fully understand that. 

However, when you have an enclosed exhibit you can secure rope, fire hose, platforms, and build structures to create these ‘layers’ for animals. giving them huge freedom of movement, climbing, brachiation. Along with this comes with an encouragement to exercise. Many primates are creatures of habit. They know that if they are going to be fed via a scatter on the floor every morning and not encouraged to climb high they will comply… which is why i believe many become overweight or in bad physical shape also. In some enclosed exhibits enable keepers to walk up on the roof and throw feeds out therefor never having to shut animals inside (thus not taking away their freedom of choice)  and giving certain species the capability of foraging as they would in the wild.

image

It looks very old school and quite bad for the visitor experience but i believe something like this is very functional. It has endless options in terms making an enriched environment for primates. due to being able to attach rope and climbing materials almost everywhere and anywhere, creating that forest layer environment from floor to roof as I mentioned earlier. 

Although the visitors view is some what restricted by looking through a cage another important sense comes into play..Our sense smell. I feel its just as important for children to learn, see and smell nature. Which is what we also have lost from more clinical, wide open island enclosures.

Of course not everyone is inclined to agree with me,.and I’m not saying this is THE way things should be. i just thing a subtlety and balance and both could create one awesome zoo exhibit! 

Thanks for the question ronracer !

It would be amazing if the two enclosures could be combined, exhibiting the animals in their naturalistic island enclosure during visitor hours, and then using the behavioral engineered enclosure for play/non-exhibiting hours! The natural approach certainly helps visitors immerse themselves into the conservation environment, connecting the animal with their wild habitat, but doesn’t stimulate the animal as much as the less aesthetically pleasing behavioral engineered system.

ACTUALLY our golden lion tamarins have such an exhibit setup. They have an enclosure with a glass wall where they are most of the time. But the keepers have the option to open a door with a rope bridge giving them access to a tree island across from it.

dynastylnoire:

jessehimself:

crowley-my-queen:

baka-kashi:

with-both-my-hearts:

sociallubrication:

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.

 

DON’T

image

GET ME STARTED

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ON THESE MOTHERFUCKERS

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That is horrifying.

If that’s scary, than say hello to my little friend, the “Stygiomedusa gigantea.” 



This guy has only been spotted 18 times, and filmed only twice.



Its is also about 6 meters long and about a meter wide. 
Sadly it doesn’t have stingers, but it will still eat. It kinda just engulfs all it’s prey. I’m not real sure.

Aren’t Jellyfish so great? Because I think they are evil.

Jellyfish are actually the only creature we know of to have mastered total neurological regeneration as well as muscular regeneration, making them immortal.

NOPE

c0ttontailsnscales:

I’m putting together a small aquarium for a special project.. And in my time shopping for supplies at various pet shops and stores I keep seeing 10g tanks advertised on their labeling as being for “fish lizards turtles hamster gerbils rats and rabbits” and it has been driving me crazy. Who in their right mind would keep a rabbit in an aquarium let alone a 10g?!? My rabbit is only 5lbs…. Which is not the smallest a full grown rabbit can be but is a pretty popular weight for most pet rabbits. This is him in a 10g in front of his 3 story custom built cage he actually has(which even that he is only in over night or when we aren’t home)….seriously baffles me.

Maybe its suppose to just be a bunny bed….

ronracer asked:

Would you care to go into detail of why you don't like open spaced island enclosures?

zoo-help:

When it comes to primates, I feel like they aren’t very functional, nor do they encourage much stimulation for primates.

Before i go on, In this answer i will be posting some pictures as examples. This is all purely my own opinion and even then i’am open to all schools of thought..I do not bear any personal ill will to the organisations or keepers looking after these exhibits. It is not a means of shaming anyone..and I will not name them by name..They are just mere examples.

In the present modern day, the perception of an animal being behind bars is seen as cruel and many people disagree with it. So These island enclosures look wide open, spacious and humane..and with a plus for institutions they give visitors an almost totally unobstructed view of the animals with huge windows and look out points across moats or high walls.

The down side to this, due to the fact the area is not enclosed, you are sevrely limited in what kind of climbing apparatus you can put inside the exhibit to prevent animals escaping. Almost every ‘island’ I’ve ever witnessed has climbing frames in the middle of enclosure and can’t offer much else. I found that the animals look bored and not stimulated by their evironment at all. 

image

image

Large trees, plants and moats are then ‘Hot wired’ with electric wire which have a small charge to stop animals climbing up..trees they’re not supposed to? as it could aid their escape..oh also it just looks nice for the visitors. :/ Personally, I find hot grasses and wire a huge eyesore as most of them are as clear as day..and kind of destroy that ‘natural’ look that zoos try to go for..your typical visitor will probably not notice I’m sure. 

image

Im also of the mind that they kind of rob animals of their full capability to climb in many different ways as they would in a forest. There are a variety of layers in a forest, from the floor all the way up to the top of the canopy. Now, Granted you will never be able to replicate the wild. I fully understand that. 

However, when you have an enclosed exhibit you can secure rope, fire hose, platforms, and build structures to create these ‘layers’ for animals. giving them huge freedom of movement, climbing, brachiation. Along with this comes with an encouragement to exercise. Many primates are creatures of habit. They know that if they are going to be fed via a scatter on the floor every morning and not encouraged to climb high they will comply… which is why i believe many become overweight or in bad physical shape also. In some enclosed exhibits enable keepers to walk up on the roof and throw feeds out therefor never having to shut animals inside (thus not taking away their freedom of choice)  and giving certain species the capability of foraging as they would in the wild.

image

It looks very old school and quite bad for the visitor experience but i believe something like this is very functional. It has endless options in terms making an enriched environment for primates. due to being able to attach rope and climbing materials almost everywhere and anywhere, creating that forest layer environment from floor to roof as I mentioned earlier. 

Although the visitors view is some what restricted by looking through a cage another important sense comes into play..Our sense smell. I feel its just as important for children to learn, see and smell nature. Which is what we also have lost from more clinical, wide open island enclosures.

Of course not everyone is inclined to agree with me,.and I’m not saying this is THE way things should be. i just thing a subtlety and balance and both could create one awesome zoo exhibit! 

Thanks for the question ronracer !

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